Our Rating

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Twitter is having a good year. Acquisitions, new hires, a growing user base and impressive revenues are all adding to the chatter surrounding the latest social media IPO.

As everyone wonders what's next for the little blue bird, answers can be found in the company's history. Billions of tweets after its conception in 2006, Twitter has swayed elections, shattered records and really pissed off Alec Baldwin.

I do not fear computers. I fear the lack of them. Isaac Asimov

Twitter's story starts at Odeo, a podcast service startup founded by Noah Glass and ex-Googler Evan Williams. The startup was a product of Glass’s idea — that a message recorded on a phone could be converted into an MP3 hosted on the Internet — and Williams’ money, along with the money of about a dozen other investors. But the company wasn't making much headway, and in an attempt at reinvention, Glass and Williams held a daylong brainstorming session to generate new ideas.

It was during this session that Jack Dorsey first introduced the idea that would become Twitter. Dorsey’s idea was that one individual could, using SMS and a specific number, send a message out to a small group of people via a public network. The number became “40404,” the project became “twttr,” and a social media network was born.

TechCrunch covered the service, implying that perhaps Odeo should stop creating fun “side projects” and instead focus on their own failing product.

Twttr then had its first surge in popularity in August, gaining thousands of users when people took to the social network to spread the word about an earthquake in San Francisco.

New Management

In September 2006, Evan Williams approached the investors of Odeo with an offer. Odeo was going nowhere, that much was obvious. The launch of iTunes with an included podcast platform had all but sounded the death knell for the company, not to mention the fact that the founders realized they didn’t really care about podcasts in the first place.

Williams approached the investors with an offer: To prevent them from taking a loss, he would buy back their shares of the company. In undoubtedly the biggest financial mistake of their lives, the investors agreed.

Twitter's story starts at Odeo, a podcast service startup founded by Noah Glass and ex-Googler Evan Williams. The startup was a product of Glass’s idea — that a message recorded on a phone could be converted into an MP3 hosted on the Internet — and Williams’ money, along with the money of about a dozen other investors. But the company wasn't making much headway, and in an attempt at reinvention, Glass and Williams held a daylong brainstorming session to generate new ideas.

It was during this session that Jack Dorsey first introduced the idea that would become Twitter. Dorsey’s idea was that one individual could, using SMS and a specific number, send a message out to a small group of people via a public network. The number became “40404,” the project became “twttr,” and a social media network was born.

TechCrunch covered the service, implying that perhaps Odeo should stop creating fun “side projects” and instead focus on their own failing product.

Twttr then had its first surge in popularity in August, gaining thousands of users when people took to the social network to spread the word about an earthquake in San Francisco.

New Management

Odeo, and twttr, now belonged to Williams.

Odeo became Obvious Corp., twttr rebranded itself as Twitter and, in a controversial move, Williams fired Noah Glass, one of Twitter’s earliest champions and who Business.

Detail Review

Screenplay / 25%
Animation / 33%
Direction / 80%
Story / 50%
Overall / 50%